RECENT EXHIBITIONS

US-Mexico Border:
Place, Imagination and Possibility
Lille, France.

Lille3000, an international multimedia show celebrating Lille as the Cultural capital of Europe with more than 50 exhibitions from April to July 2019.

I am very excited about it!
I have several pieces, including a screening of my Tumble Dreams Installation, related to Immigrants in Los Angeles, with video mapped projection on tumbleweeds, also an interactive textile piece called La Bestia\ that I did with the Mayan community in Guatemala and finally, a sound installation about the US/Mexico Border.



Mundos Alternos:

Art Science Fiction in the Americas

Queens Museum – Queens, New York
April 7th – August 19th, 2019

This show has two large pieces from my Encoded Textiles series. Art News published a brief description with a great photo of one of the pieces, It is called The Visionary, one of the large tapestries I did with the Mapuche community. 

Tumble Dreams #1, 2019, mapping projection on tumble-weeds

Tumble Dreams: The Journey

By Tressa Berman, Ph.D.,
This essay was published in the catalog of the COLA show exhibition at Barnsdall Park Municipal Art Galleery, for the recipient of the COLA grant 2017/2018 Sponsored by the Cultural Affair Department of the City of LA, April 2018.Chilean born and L.A.-bred Guillermo Bert is an artist for our time. His is a visual voice that bridges worlds through his installations, blending raw textural forms with digitized media and film. Bert’s current series, Tumble Dreams, follows from a decades-long trajectory starting with his series Encoded Textiles – begun as a joining of Mapuche weavings and smart phone technologies to tell the stories of indigenous cultural survival – and flowing from his more recent Exodus Series. The Exodus Series expanded his use of embedded technologies that, when scanned with a smart phone, open the viewer to stories steeped in places: indigenous, remote, yet present. Expanding into new formand interviews here, Bert and his collaborators trace the migratory routes of Zapotec and Mayan diaspora coming to Los Angeles to realize the American

Dream. For these dreamers (as with the DACA Dreamers caught in the bureaucratic whirlwind of policy retractions), the realization of their dream is often met with the dark side of living in its shadows. It is in those less visible places where Bert casts his light as an artist.

Stories lie at the center of Bert’s work. Less tech-centered than previous works, the pared back Tumble Dreams combines the elegance of natural objects (tumbleweeds) with oral histories “embedded” in the casing of the tumbleweed itself. His idea of how to tell those stories is at once shocking as it is compassionate. Through projected interviews, we learn about endurance and hope, about torn families subjected to the dangers of the journey. This is not an allegoric hero’s journey. This is the grist of lives split apart and confronted by the hard choices that find migrant workers in the rough and tumble worlds of bandits, border patrols, hunger and separations. These very survivals defy the threat of the border itself. The journeying migrants may appear to be like tumbleweeds, but they are not without purpose. As Bert describes,

By Tressa Berman, Ph.D.,
This essay was published in the catalog of the COLA show exhibition at Barnsdall Park Municipal Art Galleery, for the recipient of the COLA grant 2017/2018 Sponsored by the Cultural Affair Department of the City of LA, April 2018.Chilean born and L.A.-bred Guillermo Bert is an artist for our time. His is a visual voice that bridges worlds through his installations, blending raw textural forms with digitized media and film. Bert’s current series, Tumble Dreams, follows from a decades-long trajectory starting with his series Encoded Textiles – begun as a joining of Mapuche weavings and smart phone technologies to tell the stories of indigenous cultural survival – and flowing from his more recent Exodus Series. The Exodus Series expanded his use of embedded technologies that, when scanned with a smart phone, open the viewer to stories steeped in places: indigenous, remote, yet present. Expanding into new formand interviews here, Bert and his collaborators trace the migratory routes of Zapotec and Mayan diaspora coming to Los Angeles to realize the American

Dream. For these dreamers (as with the DACA Dreamers caught in the bureaucratic whirlwind of policy retractions), the realization of their dream is often met with the dark side of living in its shadows. It is in those less visible places where Bert casts his light as an artist.

Stories lie at the center of Bert’s work. Less tech-centered than previous works, the pared back Tumble Dreams combines the elegance of natural objects (tumbleweeds) with oral histories “embedded” in the casing of the tumbleweed itself. His idea of how to tell those stories is at once shocking as it is compassionate. Through projected interviews, we learn about endurance and hope, about torn families subjected to the dangers of the journey. This is not an allegoric hero’s journey. This is the grist of lives split apart and confronted by the hard choices that find migrant workers in the rough and tumble worlds of bandits, border patrols, hunger and separations. These very survivals defy the threat of the border itself. The journeying migrants may appear to be like tumbleweeds, but they are not without purpose. As Bert describes,

Previous series

There is no filter for toxic Culture, Neon Light, 36” x 36”

The price of Democracy, Laser cutting on Plexi, 40” x40”

Mask #1, LED light, Laser cutting 3D model on Plexi, 11” x 10” x 8”