MEDIA

EL PAIS NEWSPAPER / MARCH 3, 2015
El País is the most influential newspaper in Spain, they choose one of my pieces in the context of the article to describe what they called “The subversive quality of textile design” in contemporary art, pieces made with social content that bring this traditional technique in the main stream. Recently there is a number of international artists that are changing the perception of textile design and show the potential of what textiles design pieces can achieve as a medium, showing all over Europe and the USA.
//READ MORE

 

MODERN MAGAZINE / NOVEMBER 2014
This article talks about the exhibition at the Museum of Art & Design in New York City that took place from November 2014 to April 2015.
The show is called New Territories, Laboratories from Design, Craft & Art in Latin America, This is a very large exhibition that was extensible reviewed internationally.
In the Modern magazine they talk about my piece (image) In the description they do about the variety of voices that deal with the integration of crafts into an art form.
//READ MORE

 

SMITHSONIAN MAGAZINE / JULY – AUGUST 2013
The Smithsonian Magazine is running a beautiful full page article on my new series “Encoded Textiles.”” The author, Maggie Ryan Sanford, has some really smart things to say about my work and does a fantastic job explaining the scope of the project. The July/August 2013 issue of Smithsonian hit newsstands a few days ago. I have included a link to the online version of the article as well as a PDF of the printed story. I’m thrilled by all the attention my work is getting right now. I have invitations to exhibit from museums in New York, Denver, Nevada and South America! I’m feeling very grateful to all the people that have supported my work and otherwise contributed to this project in some way.
I will be heading with my film crew to Oaxaca to work with the Zapotecas in the early fall. We are also slated to work with Arizona State University and some other indigenous groups in the South West.
Please let me know if you would like to visit my studio or are interested in doing a tax deductible contribution to the project.
//WEBSITE
//READ MORE

 

PETER FRANK / ESSAY OF THE PMCA EXHIBITION / OCTOBER 2012
The Digital Age has found its way into regions of the globe largely untouched by the Mechanical Age before it. Throughout the Third World, computers sit in schoolrooms that never saw typewriters, cellphones buzz where telegraphs were unimaginable, MP3 files play where LPs never did. The poor, the earthbound, and the indigenous, long the subjects (not to mention victims) of advanced technology, are now its confident operators. In his series of Encoded Textiles Guillermo Bert symbolizes, even embodies, this newfound mastery by collapsing traditional and newly invented methods of communication into one another.
//READ MORE

 

LAWEEKLY.COM/ OCTOBER 31, 2012
At Guillermo Bert’s art studio in The Brewery, old technology fuses with new in the most harmonious way possible.
Bert’s show “Encoded Textiles,” which started Sunday at the Pasadena Museum of California Art, literally weaves together large-scale tapestries with QR codes that can be read with smart phones — leading the audience to find out something more about the native cultures whose indigenous design inspired the works.
//READ MORE

 

WHICH WAY, LA? / OCTOBER 29, 2012
Bar codes with a message: Guillermo Bert fuses ancient traditions with modern technology: The Pasadena Museum of California Art kindly requests you bring your cell phone to its new exhibit, Encoded Textiles. If you snap a photo of one of Guillermo Bert’s textiles in the gallery with a bar code reader, you’ll decode a story that transports you to the people and stories of Bert’s native Chile.
//READ MORE

 

LATIMES.COM/ OCTOBER 27, 2012
Who knew ancient pictograms used by a Chilean tribe of hunters and gatherers would dovetail aesthetically with bar code graphics that store information for drivers licenses, plane tickets and hospital bracelets? Artist Guillermo Bert, that’s who. “The pixelation, the geometric pattern, the black and white repetition that you find in bar codes is very similar to traditional South American textiles made by the Mapuche tribe in the south of Chile,” Bert says. “The similarities really blow my mind.”
//READ MORE

 

KPFK 90.7 FM RADIO/ OCTOBER 26, 2012
Beneath The Surface w/Suzi Weissman
JUMP TO TIME 38:00
//LISTEN NOW

 

ARTWEEK.LA / OCTOBER 22, 2012
In this excerpt from the exhibition catalogue, Peter Frank writes, “Guillermo Bert has based his elaborate project on a simple, if imposing, premise: human technology, however used, measures humanity – all humanity, not just specific civilizations responsible for specific devices.” Opens October 27 at the Pasadena Museum of California Art (PMCA).
//READ MORE

 

HUFFPOST / OCTOBER 22, 2012
Guillermo Bert: Encoded Textiles | In an excerpt from the exhibition catalogue, Peter Frank writes, “Guillermo Bert has based his elaborate project on a simple, if imposing, premise: human technology, however used, measures humanity — all humanity, not just specific civilizations responsible for specific devices.
//READ MORE

 

IMPACTOUSA.COM / OCTOBER 10TH 2012 / SPANISH
Primero fueron los codigos de barras. Guillermo Bert se dio cuenta de que esa etiqueta que llevan las mercancias podrian ser el simbolo de la cosificacion de la vida publica. Asi fue como empezo a crear cuadros basados en esos simbolos.
//READ MORE

 

LAOPINION.COM / OCTOBER 27TH 2012 / SPANISH
Que tienen en comun los textiles de muchos pueblos nativos de las Americas y la mas alta tecnologia de codigos en dos dimensiones que se leen usando un movil?
//READ MORE

 

KCET.ORG / SEPTEMBER 13TH 2012
The chronicles of my youth are strewn about my mother’s attic; scrapbooks, posters, pictures, and mementos hold significant amounts of memory within objects, telling a story without words. Some people choose to write in diaries or journals to record their experiences, but sometimes tangible things can tell your story. Objects, places, scents, colors, imagery and sensations; these elements evoke thoughts, feelings or memories. Sometimes words aren’t enough.
//READ MORE

 

HUFFPOST / SEPTEMBER 12TH 2012
One picture, goes the saw, is worth a thousand words. But each word in fact contains several pictures. Writing is as much a pictorial as a literary craft; originating in hieroglyphs, written words emerged as stylized depictions of the things they connoted, and the traces of those depictions have persisted even in our phoneme-based alphabets. Information is information, and as we tell it we hear it and as we hear it we see it.
//READ MORE